The chiaroscuro of Margaret Nes

As Seen in the Taos News
by Tamra Testerman | Nov 18, 2021

A 1939 photograph of a bell pepper by Edward Weston in Life Magazine was one of many photographs that influenced the aesthetics of Taos artist Margaret Nes.  

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The Power of Mother Clay

Maria Martinez and Martha Appleleaf
As Seen in the Taos News
by Tamra Testerman | Nov 18, 2021

Any discussion or study of Pueblo Pottery will The San Ildefonso Pueblo, north of Santa Fe, is home for San Ildefonso pottery, one of the most famous known art forms of the New Mexico Pueblos. Maria Martinez (1887-1980), arguably the most influential Native potter of the 1900s, and her grandniece Martha Appleleaf are from the San Ildefonso Pueblo. 

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Maria Martinez

Any discussion or study of Pueblo Pottery will inevitably lead to one name: Maria Martinez.
Collectors claim that they have “a Maria” and her fine black on black pieces are legend. If you have ever dreamed that you might add one of Maria’s pieces to your collection, now you have that opportunity.

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Ann Huston in the Land of Enchantment

Her work is her form of meditation, a way of stepping out of time and into timelessness. Ann Huston is widely recognized for her unique response to the land and culture of Northern New Mexico, her home and her muse.

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A Woman with Many Talents and Interests

Painter, muralist, illustrator and author, Illa McAfee moved to Taos with her artist husband in 1928 to become part of the burgeoning art movement.

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Through Reina’s Eyes

The brilliant artwork of Reina will dazzle you with vivid colors and charm you with the scenes of Taos life, rivers, the skies and the storybook quality of her drawings.

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ELEVEN

Opening Saturday, September 25th, 2021 . 4:00-7:00

The ELEVEN show is a kaleidoscope of creativity. Each person has a distinct point of view, recognizable and divergent. This show will anoint the expanded space at Chimayo Trading with the energy of newness, a frisson created by showing a body of work that has truly never been seen or felt before.

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Powerful Paintings
by Walt Gonske

Opening Friday, September 24th,  2021 . 5:00-7:00

We at the expanded Chimayo Trading Gallery are currently showing newer works by Walt Gonske. He comes to our gallery with a cadre of collectors, a legion of fans and a sphere of influence that precedes him and emanates out in all directions.

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Samuel Manymules
Minimalist Navajo Potter

Samuel Manymules is known for his modern take on the long tradition of Native American pottery. Collectors of his work find the high polish of his surfaces and the “fire clouds” from the traditional firing methods combine to create his own unique aesthetic.

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Carl Redin 1892-1944

Carl Redin was born in Sweden and as a youngster, he was fascinated with the American west. His talent was recognized at 14 he began his study of art in Stockholm. Drafted into the Swedish Navy, he left Navy life and immigrated to the US and settled in Chicago.

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Who is Rudolph Carl Gorman?

Better known as R.C. Gorman, (1931-2005) he was a Native American artist of the Navajo Nation.  Referred to as “the Picasso of American Indian artists” by the New York Times, his paintings are primarily Native American women, characterized by fluid forms and simple lines, with touches of brilliant color.

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Ralph Meyers, a Taos Character

At the center of the vibrant cultural mix of the Taos Art Colony, in what may have been its most vibrant phase, there stood one man who would become famous for his role in Taos’s diverse history. Indians, Spanish, Anglos and Europeans alike sought out Ralph Meyers (1885-1948).

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Doug Candelaria
Pueblo Artist

For at least 6 hours every day, Douglas Candelaria paints. He immerses himself in scenes of the American West featuring the majesty and color of the landscape and figures on horseback, often riding at night.

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Giovanna Paponetti
Master Painter  

“Every brushstroke brings me closer to my quest to discover old instincts and how I relate to the world around me. As I capture the spirit of my models on canvas, they bring life to me as well. It is a union of mutual respect and gives me the courage to fly.”

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Michelle Tsosie Sisneros 

A highly regarded contemporary artist of Santa Clara, Navajo and Laguna descent, Michelle Tsosie Sisneros paints traditional Native American themes with abstract elements and surrealist influences.

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Walt Gonske 

For four decades, landscape impressionist painter Walt Gonske has braved the snow and the sun, scaled rocks and rivers and sought out the obscure evocative locations that inspire him to paint.  His expressive brush captures the felt experience of a place in time using texture and stunning color combinations.

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Alyce Frank 

Born in New Iberia, Louisiana, where Tabasco sauce is made, Alyce refers to her own birth as her first artistic experience. She had a solid education and was admitted into the University of Chicago when she was only a sophomore in High School. 

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The Laughing Family of Navajo Weavers 

A very traditional Navajo woman, Mona Laughing learned weaving from her mother Elsie Mark. Mona raised 6 children in Crystal, NM and remarkably put all of them through college by selling her weavings. 

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A visit to Ranchos de Taos is like stepping back to a time when life was slower 

At the center of the plaza stands the historic San Francisco de Assís Church which has been the subject of work by Ansel Adams and Georgia OKeefe. 

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New Works by Donna Clair 

There are few artists who can remain relevant, whose images are fresh and whose realism meets a storybook in the enchanting way that Donna Clair does. 

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Glenn Fred
Hopi Kachina Carver 

Born in 1955, Glenn Fred comes from a tiny Hopi village of Bacavi, where his father was governor. He has 5 brothers who also carve the Kachina dolls that are at the root of Hopi tradition and education. 

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Gene Kloss
An American Printmaker 

Alice Geneva Glasier became known as Gene Kloss, one of America’s finest printmakers. Born in Oakland, California in 1903, she died a loved and respected artist in Taos, New Mexico in 1996. 

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Jewelry That Makes A Statement 

Extraordinary necklaces from the boldest to the most delicate are on display in our Chimayo Trading Del Norte Gallery. 

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Painting the Navajo Way of Life, Harrison Begay

Harrison Begay, also known as Haskay Yahne Yah (meaning “Warrior Who Walked Up to His Enemy”), 1914-2012 is a renowned Diné (Navajo) painter, printmaker and illustrator specializing in watercolors, gouache and silkscreen prints.

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A Different Drum made by Lee Lujan of Taos Pueblo

Lee Lujan continues the long tradition of making drums that he learned from his Pueblo family.

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Donna Clair
A Taos Treasure

Southwest impressionist painter Donna Clair moved from Chicago to Santa Fe in 1967.  She was a single mother with a 2 year old and 5 month old twins and yet she managed to make a career for herself and her family by painting what captivated her.

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Making the Case for Baskets

A collection of baskets is a collection of time: the time it took for the grasses and reeds and bark to grow, the time to gather and the time to weave..

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Chimayo Trading is featured in Taos News, Tempo

by Tamra Testerman
Photos by Morgan Timms

Chimayo Trading Del Norte is nestled in the Ranchos Plaza in the shadow of the iconic Saint Francis church in Ranchos de Taos. 

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Our Mata Ortiz/Casas Grandes Pottery Collection is now online!

A young Mexican boy looking for firewood finds a pottery shard from a Pre-Hispanic culture. So began a creative and artistic explosion in the little town of Mata Ortiz in Chihuahua.

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At Chimayo Trading del Norte we’ve been busy adding hundreds of beautiful pieces of pottery to our new website..

We carry a wide variety of different contemporary or historic styles from all the native pueblos of New Mexico.

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Hopi Kachinas by Chester Poleyestewa

The Kachina doll was and is made for Native use by Hope fathers and uncles to give to their daughters or nieces; primarily the doll is hung on the wall or from the rafters of the house so that it may be seen at all times. The purpose is to teach their children about the different Kachina masks, their outfits, and body painting. Therefore, the doll has to be as perfect as possible, and certainly so in mask features. This may explain in part why the earlier dolls were accurate and detailed outline, often with more suggestions of arms and legs. Read more… 

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